Tag Archives: The Digest Enthusiast

Status Report

The seventh issue of The Digest Enthusiast will be out in December. There’s a little work on the cover remaining, when that’s done I’ll order a print proof and hopefully release it soon after. Beginning with this issue, the Kindle version will be a fixed-page layout. Here’s TDE7’s contributor list:

Lesann Berry
Tom Brinkmann
Steve Carper
Peter Enfantino
Richard Krauss
Marc Myers
Michael Neno
Vince Nowell, Sr.
Rick Ollerman
Josh Pachter
Robert Snashall
Bob Vojtko
Joe Wehrle, Jr.

The second issue of the new Pulp Modern is also underway. Editor Alec Cizak is busy finalizing the stories, while I’m working on the photo-conversions, nearing the half-way point. Once those are done, I’ll get started on the layout. Aiming for a December release on this one too.

Pulp Literature is adding “breaking news” emails to their marketing mix. The email will feature updates on Pulp Literature and special offers. Or you can sign-up to receive only their monthly PL eNewsletter. Where? Here.

New Mystery Vol. 1 #2 Spring 1992

new_mystery_2

New Mystery Vol. 1 #2 cover by Robert McGinnis

Excerpt from the interview with Bill Crider, from The Digest Enthusiast book five:

“I met the editor of New Mystery [Charles Raisch] at a Bouchercon, and he asked me if I’d do a story for him. “Death’s Brother” was the result. Also in that issue of the magazine is the first published story by Dave Zeltserman, who’s gone on to quite
a bit of fame as a writer of hard- boiled crime and horror fiction. “

New Mystery was a full size magazine that ran for 16 issues from Summer 1991 to Summer 1999, publish from once-a-year to quarterly (1996) over its run. Based in New York, the magazine was sold at book fairs and conventions, and distributed by Eastern News based in Ohio.

Contents
Bookstores We Like
Book Reviews
“A Long Time to Die” by David Zeltserman
“Harder Than To Die” by Shizuko Natsuki, translation by Robert B. Rohm
“Death’s Brother” by Bill Crider
“Rest Peace Quiet” by Ronnie Klaskin, art by Hilda Borem
“Hoods” by Monte Cross and Jack Dolphin, art by Donald David and Harris
“The Walls Came Tumbling” by Billie Sue Mosiman, art by Rachel Pulaski
“All Kinds of Phantoms” by Paco Ignacio Taibo II, translation by William I. Neuman
“His ’N’ Hers” by Alan Horvitz, Betty Page photo c/o Dave Stevens
“Night Chase” by John Lutz

Ellery Queen Selects: J25

jp25Unlike previous issues of the unpredictable Ellery Queen Selects series, Jonathan Press J25 featured a novel instead of a collection of short stories. John Dickson Carr’s It Walks by Night was the writer’s first novel, written at age 24, starring French detective Henri Bencolin, and had previously been published and reprinted at least a half dozen times by Pocket Books beginning in 1941.

The November Reader’s Digest is out, and besides “The 10 Nicest Places in America” check out page 32. Yup, it’s another cartoon from the prolific Bob Vojtko, the working-class cartoonist and long-suffering Cleveland Browns observer.

RD-11-2017-500

Bud Plant’s Incredible Catalog

Page-10For me, the best part of the Seattle Antiquarian Book Fair last weekend, was Bud Plant’s display. It was the first time I attended the show and it gave me a case of sticker shock. By far, the majority of the nearly 100 booksellers at the show displayed rare and rich books, maps, postcards, photographs, and other collectible paper products. It was fun to see first editions of Tarzan, Oz, Dr. Seuss, and Mickey Mouse books, and the works of authors like Steinbeck, Bukowski, and Hemingway, but the prices really put me off.

I had hoped there would be more paperbacks and digests, but they were in the minority. In fairness, one seller had sets of Suspense, Mysterious Traveler, Beyond, and Avon Fantasy Reader. Another had a copy of Analog with Orson Scott Card’s Ender’s Game, with a $50 price tag as I recall. (A quick check on eBay shows prices from $25 to $200, so maybe I’m just out of touch.)

Few sellers had BLBs, but those that did, had great selections, at prices beyond my shoestring budget. Fortunately, Steven Woolfolk was there. He had the best assortment of digests at the show—an entire box. He’s preparing to open a shop in the Uptown Antique Mall in Richland, Washington this spring. I bought an issue of Imagination for $10 and an Armed Services Edition of Dracula for $15 from him. Later I found a second copy of the ASE Dracula at another booth, priced at $95.

I also met Bud Plant, who said he attends the show every year. He may well have been the only bookseller there who was selling entirely brand new books. I was thrilled to see a set of The Digest Enthusiast on one of his shelves. Bud’s latest catalog, the Holiday 2017 edition is out. I didn’t realize until a day later that he’d included TDE on page ten. If you aren’t already on his mailing list, you may want to sign up. Or, you can download a PDF of the catalog from the Bud’s Art Books website.

Ellery Queen Selects

j26The grand plans for the Ellery Queen Selects series began in 1947. Jonathan Press J26, Stuart Palmer’s “The Riddles of Hildegarde Withers,” was numerically the second in the series.

The excerpt from Frederic Dannay’s introduction to J26 below refers to “First Edition Mysteries.” This was apparently an inside, working title, as the digests replaced it with “Ellery Queen Selects” displayed across the top of the covers.

“[W]e preserve in our noble experiment, our colossal publishing venture, and bring you the next in our series [starting with the Hammett collections] of First Edition Mysteries—“The Riddles Of Hildegarde Withers” by Stuart Palmer. Coming soon—watch for them!—will be John Dickson Carr’s never-previously-published book of short stories titled “Dr. Fell, Detective and Other Stories;” Roy Vickers’s never-previously-published “The Department Of Dead Ends;” and Margery Allingham’s “The Case Book Of Mr. Campion;” and unquestionably there will be additional First Edition Mysteries to follow.”

Black Cat Mystery Magazine #3, Halloween 1981

black_cat_3Bill Crider on his story with Joe Lansdale for Black Cat Mystery Magazine #3, an indie anthology digest, from his interview for The Digest Enthusiast book five:

BC: Wow. “A Right to be Dead” was a long time ago. Joe Lansdale and I were corresponding by letters (as I said, a long time ago), and I was trying to write a story that might fit Mike Shayne’s Mystery Magazine. What I came up with was “A Right to be Dead,” and I thought it had a great first line, which I still remember: “The dead man sat up and looked around.” It didn’t sell to Shayne, so Joe said he’d look it over and punch it up, which he did. I wrote most of it, and he did the polish and the marketing.

He eventually sold the story to Black Cat Mystery Magazine, which was published in Canada. I was thrilled, and I was even more thrilled when the editors agreed to buy another story from us before “A Right to be Dead” was published.

After the TDE interview was published, Tore Stokka wrote to say the story was reprinted in Lansdale’s anthology For A Few Stories More.