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News Digest July 24, 2020

Amazing Selects: The Guns of Pluto by Allen Steele

New Release
Amazing Selects: The Guns of Pluto by Allen Steele (Captain Future)
Contents Page
Paul Di Filippo’s Newton’s Laws of Thrills (Introduction)
Steve Davidson: Publisher’s Introduction
Who is Captain Future?
Interlude: Marshall Gurney Reports
Allen Steele “The Guns of Pluto” (The Return of Ul Quorn, Book II)
Edmond Hamilton “The Harpers of Titan”
About the Author: Allen Steele
About the Creator: Edmond Hamilton
About the Cover Artist: Renon Boe
About the Interior Artist: M.D. Jackson
About the Comet II Artist: Rob Caswell
5.5” x 8.5” 205 pages
Print $8.99 Kindle $8.99
Amazing Stories website

Worlds of Tomorrow Sept. 1965

Digest Magazine Reviews
Victoria Silverwolf
reviews Worlds of Tomorrow Sept 1965 at Galactic Journey.

Digest Magazines and Authors
Art Taylor’s
new e-newsletter is out.

Deborah L. Davitt discusses her poem “Vintage Years” at Asimov’s From Earth to the Stars.

David Bridge, whose story “Feral Flesh” appears in EQMM Jul/Aug 2020, recalls Creepers by Keith Gray at Something is Going to Happen.

Espionage No. 1

Andrew Kozma reflects on his story “Mars, the Dumping Ground of the Solar System” from Analog Jul/Aug 2020 at The Astounding Analog Companion.

John Floyd writes about his story “Crow’s Nest” from EQMM Jan/Feb 2020 at The First Two Pages. (Thanks, Kevin Tipple.)

Peter Wood examines apocalyptic fiction, while his story “Why I’ll Never Get Tenure” appears in Asimov’s Jul/Aug 2020, at From Earth to the Stars.

Josh Pachter recalls Espionage Magazine with Jeff Quest on the Spybrary Podcast.

Restoration by Art Taylor

Storytime
Hector Acosta’s
“La Cocinera” at Rusty Barnes’ Tough Crime.

Barb Goffman reports Art Taylor’s story “Restoration,” originally published in Crime Syndicate Magazine is available free at Black Cat Mystery.

Alec Cizak reads his story “The Bag Girl” from Tough 2 at ACTV.

TDE Contributors’ Corner
Michael Neno
, who drew the illustration for Rick Ollerman’s story “Sock Monster” for The Digest Enthusiast No. 12 posted his thoughts on the issue and awarded it a five-star rating on GoodReads. Thanks, Michael!

The issue also garnered a five-star rating from Steve Alcorn on Amazon.com. Thank you, Steve!

As long as I seem to be grouping all the TDE12 updates here, I’m also grateful to James Reasoner for his kind words at Rough Edges.

Vampi 19, Eerie 42, Creepy 48

Uncle Jack (Seabrook) and Cousin Peter (Enfantino) review Vampirella No. 19 & 20, Eerie No. 42 & 43, and Creepy No. 48 & 49 at bare•bones e-zine.

Vampi 20, Eerie 43, Creepy 49

Steve Carper takes a deep dive into Space Kit. That’s right, your very own chunk of space in a box! Get all the answers at Flying Cars and Food Pills.

Readin’ and Writin’
David Lovelock
created a story outline grid based on the Advanced Fiction Writing class at Writing Academy.

Gods of their own making. A book I picked up years ago because it sounded interesting was Tales of Ancient Egypt by Roger Lancelyn Green. At long last, I finished reading it this week. The prologue explains the ancient civilization was “the most self-contained of all the countries of the ancient world; it lived its own life, practiced its own religion and made up its own stories…”

First conquered by the Greeks, and then the Romans, many of Egypt’s stories were lost. Those that survived were hidden in its hieroglyphs, rediscovered in more modern times. The stories in this collection were carved on tablets or painted on papyrus by Egyptians or preserved by Greek historians.

But all were recorded by or for the pleasure of the ruling class, and reflect their narrow perspectives. There are peasants included, but none rise above their station unless gifted with uncommon beauty or prophecy. The slaves who built the great pyramids and temples pass through unseen.

These stories and fables provide a fascinating glimpse into ancient Egyptian history and culture as perceived by those who benefited most. A single line repeated again and again throughout the stories and reigns, the first words uttered in the presence of a Pharaoh, “Life, health, and strength be to you!” speaks volumes.

Tales of Ancient Egypt, White Fragility, F&SF 7/8 2020

Finished listening to the audio book White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo, with a forward by Michael Eric Dyson. The book defines white privilege and advises us that eradicating systemic racism is a continuum for American society and every individual white person who benefits from it. The book increased my understanding of its topics. I think its reviews and ratings on amazon tell a story of their own. Ratings (7-21-20) 70% 5-Star, 8% 4-Star, 3% 3-Star, 2% 2-Star, and 17% 1-Star.

Also, finished reading the Jul/Aug 2020 issue of Fantasy & Science Fiction. It’s a satisfying collection of stories spanning the breadth of its territory. Some light and humorous, some deep and sombre. All well written. Since I prefer action/adventure fiction my favorites lean in that direction; those by David Erik Nelson, Bennett North, Madeleine Robins, and Brian Trent. But that doesn’t mean I didn’t enjoy the balance. Taken as a collection, the variety adds to the overall strength and enjoyment of the issue.

TDE12 pages 52 & 53

Read all about Lester del Rey’s “Five Ages of Science Fiction” by Vince Nowell, Sr. in The Digest Enthusiast No. 12 available at Lulu.com in print and in digital format at Kindle and Magzter.

Mike Shayne Mystery Magazine Nov. 1964

Vintage Crime Digest
Mike Shayne Mystery Magazine Nov. 1964
Contents Page
Brett Halliday “Death in Cell Five” (Mike Shayne)
Alson J. Smith “The Name of the Game”
Walter Dallas “Killer in the Bleachers”
Morris Hershman “Chicken Contest”
Dennis Lynds “No Loose Ends”
Maurice Leblanc “The Escape of Arsene Lupin”
James Holding “The Spook Goes West”
Carroll Mayers “One Hour for Crime”

Mike Shayne Mystery Magazine Vol. 15 No. 6 Nov. 1964
Publisher: Leo Margulies
Editorial Director: Cylvia Kleinman
Associate Editor: Frank B. Long
5.5” x 7.75” 144 pages 50¢

News Digest Feb. 8, 2020

Mystery Weekly Magazine Feb. 2020

The new Mystery Weekly Magazine Feb. 2020 was released on the first. Included are stories by Arthur Davis, Jeff H., Jill Hand, Anthony Lowe, Susan Oleksiw, Eric B. Ruark, and Michael Wells. MWM is edited by Kerry Carter and published by Chuck Carter. Cover by Robin Grenville-Evans. The 82-page print edition is $6.99, Kindle $2.99.

Kieran Shea decides to “Shake It Up” at EQMM’s blog Something is Going to Happen.

A.J. Ward joins Analog’s 90th anniversary celebration with “1942 and the Power of Names” at The Astounding Analog Companion blog.

Alex Irvine discusses his story “Chisel and Crime” with F&SF.

Tough Crime features William R. Soldan’s fiction “King of the Blue Rose” and SleuthSayers features Robert Lopresti’s story “Shot By Your Partner” part one and part two.

J.D. Graves reviews Norco ’80 by Peter Houlahan over at EconoClash Review.

Tony Gleeson and I connected on Facebook, which led to an interview that will be included in The Digest Enthusiast No. 12. He sent a nice collection of scans, so his comments will be well illustrated.

I read the first edition of Amazing Selects this week, featuring Allen Steele’s novella “Captain Future in Love.” It’s the first part of a larger story: The Return of Ul Quorn, which is the follow-on to his novel Avengers of the Moon. Look for my review in TDE12, coming in June 2020.

Also coming up is a piece on Ray Palmer’s Science Stories, an interim title that ran for four issues after he sold his interest in Clark Publishing which had published Other Worlds. It is, in effect, a short-lived continuation of that title.

The mailing of contributor copies of TDE11 wrapped up this week, and Michael Neno gave us a shoutout on Facebook. Michael contributed a beautiful illustration for the late Joe Wehrle, Jr.’s story “Zymurgy for Aliens.”

Collectors of comics and digest magazines may want to check out by storefront in eBay: Arkay37’s Vintage Collectables If I do say so myself, the prices are bargains.

True Crime Detective Fall 1952

From the Vault
True Crime Detective Fall 1952

The inside front cover features a full-page ad for the magazine with actor Ralph Bellamy extolling it’s virtues.

The many detective parts I’ve played have naturally made me somewhat of a student of criminology. For a long time I wished for a magazine that would present true crime cases in a straight-forward, exciting way—but without sensationalism and trick photography. When True Crime Detective came along I knew I had my wish!

True Crime Detective Vol. 2 No. 4 Fall 1952
Contents Page
The Borderlands of Sanity:
Miriam Allen deFord “1. The Case of Leopold and Loeb”
Anthony Boucher “2. The Case of Neville Heath”
Joseph Henry Jackson “Give a Man a Horse”
Frank Mullady “Murderers on the Loose”
Edward D. Radin: Here’s the Answer (readers’ crime-related Q&A)
Janet Flanner “The Murder in Le Mans”
Lenore Glen Offord “The Red Barn Revisited”
Edgar Lustgarten “The Trial of William Herbert Wallace”

Publisher: Lawrence E. Spivak
Editors: Anthony Boucher, J. Francis McComas
General Manager: Joseph W. Ferman
Managing Editor: Robert P. Mills
Advisory Editor: Charles Angoff
Consulting Editor: Edward D. Radin
Art Director: George Salter
Cover: Dirone Photography from “The Case of Neville Heath”
5.5” x 7.75” 128 pages 35¢