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James H. Schmitz

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The Telzey Toy

Analog January 1971

Excerpt from Joe Wehrle, Jr.’s article on “The Telzey Amberdon Stories of James H. Schmitz” in The Digest Enthusiast No. 7:

The Telzey Toy (Analog January 1971). A producer of biological the- ater puppets that supposedly have no self-awareness kidnaps Telzey and makes a self-aware duplicate of her who agrees to be called Gaziel. Telzey’s psi abilities have been repressed until the man, Ti, can learn how to control them and her for his own purposes. Telzey needs to free herself as well as Gaziel, who will gradually be able to develop her own distinct personality when free to do so.

Compulsion

Analog June 1970

Excerpt from Joe Wehrle, Jr.’s article on “The Telzey Amberdon Stories of James H. Schmitz” in The Digest Enthusiast No. 7:

Compulsion (Analog June 1970). Telzey Amberdon meets Trigger Argee for the first time. The tree-like siren creatures, known to themselves as Hanas, cause an addiction in humans and other creatures who come in contact with them, and on the three planets they cover, have gradually changed all other creatures until they are little more than parasites.

Resident Witch

Analog May 1970

Excerpt from Joe Wehrle, Jr.’s article on “The Telzey Amberdon Stories of James H. Schmitz” in The Digest Enthusiast No. 7:

Resident Witch (Analog May 1970). Telzey agrees to help Wellan Dasinger locate a man who has been abducted by his brother and hidden until he can be permanently disposed of; but the situation proves to be more complex than anticipated, and Telzey risks her life and safety in a temporary personality exchange in order to bring matters to conclusion. Reprinted in The Telzey Toy (DAW #82 1973).

Sleep No More

Analog August 1965

Excerpt from Joe Wehrle, Jr.’s article on “The Telzey Amberdon Stories of James H. Schmitz” in The Digest Enthusiast No. 7:

Sleep No More (Analog August 1965). Telzey is still in danger from the source behind the spook attack—seemingly to trap a psi—but this time she is menaced by a teleporting creature. What happens when a psi creature is tricked into materializing inside solid rock? We find out. Reprinted in The Lion Game (DAW #38 1973, British hardcover from Sidgwick and Jackson, 1976).

Telzey’s Goblin Night

Analog April 1965

Excerpt from Joe Wehrle, Jr.’s article on “The Telzey Amberdon Stories of James H. Schmitz” in The Digest Enthusiast No. 7:

Goblin Night (Analog April 1965). On a camping trip with eleven other college students and her friend’s huge dog, Telzey receives a mental image of a person running, terrified, from a relentless pursuer. Tracking the source, she is led into a trap where she is the one pursued by the frightening creature called “the spook.” At the end of her resources, Telzey mentally summons Chomir for help. This suspenseful story has to be one of the series’ highlights. Reprinted as the first part of The Lion Game (DAW #38 1973, British hardcover from Sidgwick and Jackson, 1976).

Telzey Amberdon

Jamese H. Schmitz portrait by Joe Wehrle, Jr.
James H. Schmitz by Joe Wehrle, Jr.

Excerpt from Joe Wehrle, Jr.’s article on “The Telzey Amberdon Stories of James H. Schmitz” in The Digest Enthusiast No. 7:

Undercurrents (Analog May and June 1964). Gonwil, Telzey’s best college friend, is being victimized by her guardians, in hopes of securing the financial holdings she is to inherit. Wellan Dasinger of the Kyth Agency works with Telzey’s psionic abilities to solve the problem, and we meet Chomir, Gonwil’s mighty guardian dog. Reprinted in The Universe Against Her. Ace, 1964.

Telzey Amberdon

Telzey Amberdon and Tick-tock by Joe Wehrle, Jr.Excerpt from Joe Wehrle, Jr.’s article on “The Telzey Amberdon Stories of James H. Schmitz” in The Digest Enthusiast No. 7:

James H. Schmitz wrote a number of stories about a future world where many things are possible, and particularly, over a period of ten years wrote a series concerning one Telzey Amberdon, an emerging telepath, “fifteen years old, genius level, brown as a berry and not at all bad looking in her sunbriefs.”

Jim Schmitz was born October 15, 1911, and lived until April 18, 1981. You may not be too familiar with his work as he wasn’t as prolific as many of his contemporaries, but he wrote dozens of exceptional stories and a handful of memorable novels.