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News Digest April 3, 2020

Analog Apr. 1965 & If May 1965

Analog April 1965 reviewed by Gideon Marcus at Galactic Journey.

Mystery Weekly Magazine Nov. 2019 reviewed by Kevin Tipple at Kevin’s Corner.

Worlds of If May 1965 reviewed by David Levinson at Galactic Journey.

Mar/Apr 2020 Digests

Digest Blogs
Mark W. Tiedemann
discusses “The Story I’m Working on Now” at The Astounding Analog Companion.

Pat Black on fictional shelters at Something is Going to Happen.

Brian Trent discusses “Death on the Nefertem Express” at Fantasy & Science Fiction.

Nostalgia Digest Podcast
Every month since 2012, the Nostalgia Digest Podcast has taken listeners on a trip back to the “Golden Age” of entertainment . . . and as the Podcast turns 100, they’re celebrating with the help of two special guests” Patty McCormack (The Bad Seed, Mama) and Rich (Svengoolie) Kaz! Click here to start listening!

JD Graves and Pulp Literature No. 26

Free Crime Fiction
L.A. Wilson, Jr.’s
“The Whisperers” was sent to Mystery Weekly Magazine’s email subscriber’s list on March 29, 2020. Sign up at Mystery Weekly Magazine.

Nikki Dolson’s “Liars, Killers and Thieves” at Rusty Barnes’ Tough Crime.

J.D. Graves offers “Just Another Job that Doesn’t Pay Very Well” for Kindle.

Pulp Literature e-News
The April update from Pulp Literature includes an advance look at issue No. 26 for Spring 2020.

Pulp Adventures No.34

Readin’ and Writin’
This week’s main read was Pulp Adventures No. 34, published by Rich Harvey, and edited by Audrey Parente. Here’s what’s behind the cover by Albert Fisher (from Front Page Detective Jan. 1941):

Editorial by Rich Harvey
Robert Leslie Bellem has three pulp reprints in this issue; one under the pseudonym William Decatur. Rich Harvey explores Bellem’s Hollywood Dectective: “Does the series epitomize the genre of hardboiled detectives . . . Or does the series actually lampoon the genre and its tropes, which were becoming cliché even before World War II commenced?” Perhaps, both.

“In a Sentimental Mood” by Logan Robichaud
Isaac A. Massinger is a suspected communist, his politics and advocacy cleverly hidden between the lines of his stories. Special Agents Beard and Greene have him under surveillance. The exact time period isn’t clear, but Massinger writes on a typewriter. When confronted at his apartment, Massinger allows a search of the premises and Beard discovered a trove of incriminating papers hidden beneath the floor. Moody and atmospheric, Robichaud’s prose exudes pulp while probing ideology, art, and connection.

“Death Do Us Part” by William Decatur (Robert Leslie Bellem)
“Fogarty had never been known to go back on his word, whether dealing with crooks or the Law. And for that reason, they picked him as go-between. The private detective was safe enough with $40,000—but that didn’t mean he was safe with women.”

P.I. Bob Fogarty is hired by Continental Assurance to deliver forty grand to a guy in Kansas City in exchange for eighty grand worth of stolen diamonds. The action and wordplay are non-stop in this intricately plotted screwball mystery adventure.

“Kill Me Again” by Robert Leslie Bellem
Turns out the previous narrative was only a warm-up for this scintillating Dan Turner, Hollywood Detective yarn. Turner returns home from a High Sierra camping trip with his pal newshound Jim Spencer and encounters his own funeral procession! Somebody was quick to capitalize on his two-week absence from civilization and wound up dead in a spectacular wreck while driving his car.

“Killer in Clay” by Robert Leslie Bellem and Adolphe Barreaux
It’s quite interesting to read a Hollywood Detective comic story right after an adventure in prose. In this form, the author concentrates on plot with minimal narration, allowing the artwork to carry the action and dialog to tell the story. It’s fun, but lacks the depth and wordplay of Bellem’s prose stories.

“Comrade” by Adam Beau McFarlane
A massive sand storm forces Allied and Axis tanks to take shelter in an abandoned rail station. Under their impromptu truce, the opposing tank commanders engage in a high-stakes card game to determine their fate.

“On the Ego Identity of a Butterfly” by Patti Boeckman and Sharla Williams
Like Pulp Adventures itself, this story combines the best of old and new pulp. Boeckman wrote it years ago, Williams “brushed it up,” for first time publication here. A youngster ekes out his childhood in a severely authoritarian family, his only friend an adopted butterfly that he attempts to tame.

“City of the Dead” by William M. Hope
A sword and sorcery novella joins series character Thurl the Gaelg on his trek to Samorrah to cash in the glowing blood red stone that recently came into his possession. But Samorrah has earned its mantle as the City of the Dead. The burly soldier of fortune will need all his wits and swordsmanship to survive the thieves, warriors, and the witch that lies ahead.

“Athena D” by Charles Burgess
Post-graduate Mike Simmons and his girlfriend, Jennifer Rolland, find themselves in the middle of a secret operation to disarm a Chinese satellite from the Yerkes Observatory in Williams Bay, Wisconsin.

“Straight Ahead Into Darkness” by Ron Riekki
An EMT finds himself with one for the books when he and his partner arrive at a trailer park to find an elderly man with a Taser dark stuck in his eye.

Pulp Adventures offers a pleasing collection of vintage and brand new pulp-inspired stories and artwork, across the genre spectrum. This issue is no exception. It’s available for $9.95 in print, directly from Bold Venture Press and other outlets.

Alec Cizak offered free ad space for indie authors in the next Pulp Modern (first come, first served) on his twitter feed, which filled up in a matter of hours. The “winners” submitted their ads, which have now been added to the layout.

Also completed the layout of Steve Carper’s article about Photoplay Editions for the upcoming The Digest Enthusiast No. 12. It’s loaded with cover images from these early digest series. And Michael Neno finished his color illustration for Rick Ollerman’s story.

Verdict Sept. 1953

Vintage Crime Digest
Verdict Vol. 1 No. 4 Sept. 1953
Unfortunately, Verdict didn’t continue after this issue, thus the conclusion of Rex Stout’s Fer-De-Lance was never presented.

Contents Page
William Irish “Three O’Clock” art by Tom O’Sullivan
James M. Cain “Dead Man”
Fredric Brown “the Amazing Dip”
Dan Sontup’s Tricks of the Trade: Firearms
George Harmon Coxe “Material Witness” art by Tom O’Sullivan
Frank Kane “Keeper of the Killed” (Johnny Liddell)
Craig Rice “Motive” (John J. Malone)
Rex Stout “Fer-De-Lance” (Part 4 of 5)(Nero Wolfe)
John C. Craig’s What’s In a Name? and Encores
Evan Hunter “Vicious Circle”
Leonard S. Grey “What’s Your Verdict? No. 3”

Verdict Vol. 1 No. 4 Sept. 1953
Published monthly by Flying Eagle Publications, Inc.
Editor: John McCloud
Managing Editor: E.A. Tulman
Art Director: Chas. W. Adams
Editorial Assistant: Hal Walker
Business Manager: R.E. Decker
5.5” x 7.75” 144 pages 35¢

News Digest March 20, 2020

F&SF Mar/Apr 2020

March Releases
Fantasy & Science Fiction Mar/Apr 2020
Contents Pages
Dare Segun Falowo “Kikelomo Ultrasheen”
SL Huang “The Million-Mile Sniper”
Matthew Hughes “The Last Legend”
Charles de Lint’s Books to Look For
Catfishing on CatNet by Naomi Kritzer
A Song for a New Day by Sarah Pinsker
I Know What I Saw by Linda S. Godfrey
In the Heart of the Fire by Dean Koontz
Photographing the Dead by Dean Koontz
The Praying Mantis Bride by Dean Koontz
Red Rain by Dean Koontz
The Mercy of Snake by Dean Koontz
Memories of Tomorrow by Dean Koontz
Women of Science Fiction and Fantasy Television by Karen A. Romanko
Mingus Fingers by Jacob Weisman
Elizabeth Hand’s Books
Ormeshadow by Priya Sharma
The Muders of Molly Southbourne by Tade Thompson
The Survival of Molly Southbourne by Tade Thompson
A Spectral Hue by Craig Laurance Gidney
Ian Tregillis “Come the Revolution”
John Possidente “Red Sword of the Celiac”
Lauren McBride “To My Shipmates at Journey’s End” (verse)
Amman Sabet “Say You’re Sorry”
Gregor Hartmann “A Solitary Crane Circles Cold Mountain”
Deborah L. Davitt “4 Vesta” (verse)
Amanda Hollander “A Feast of Butterflies”
David J. Skal’s Films: Wet Screams
Jerry Oltion’s Science: Natural Disasters in Utopia
William Ledbetter “Hungry Is the Earth”
Elizabeth Bear “Hacksilver”
Brian Trent “Death on the Nefertem Express”
James Patrick Kelly “The Man I Love”
Coming Attractions
F&SF Market Place
Graham Andrews’ Curiosities: Public Faces by Harold Nicolson (1932)

Are Snakes Necessary? by Brian De Palma and Susan Lehman

Fantasy & Science Fiction Vol. 138 No. 3 and 4, No. 748, Mar/Apr 2020
Publisher: Gordon Van Gelder
Editor: C.C. Finlay
Assistant Publishers: Barbara J. Norton, Keith Kahla
Assistant Editors: Robin O’Connor, Stephen L. Mazur, Lisa Rogers
Contests Editor: Carol Pinchefsky
Cover: Mondolithic Studios
Cartoons: Arthur Masear, Kendra Allenby, Mark Heath, Nick Downes
258 pages, $8.99 on newsstands until May 4, 2020
Fantasy & Science Fiction website

Hard Case Crime released Are Snakes Necessary? by Brian De Palma and Susan Lehman on March 17, 2020. Hardcover $22.99 Kindle $7.99 from amazon.

Digest and Book Reviews
Repo Shark by Cody Goodfellow reviewed by J.D. Graves at EconoClash Review.

Repo Shark & Thunder Wagon

The premise of “single paragraph book reviews” seems apt for this age of browsing. The March 15th review at Mostly Old Books and Rust features Thunder Wagon by James Reasoner and L.J. Washburn.

Worlds of Tomorrow May 1965 reviewed by Victoria Silverwolf at Galactic Journey.

Hell Chose Me by Angel Luis Colon

Hell Chose Me by Angel Luis Colon reviewed by Matthew X. Gomez at EconoClash Review.

Fantasy & Science Fiction April 1965 reviewed by Gideon Marcus on Galactic Journey.

Digest Blogs
Beth Dawkins’
Q&A at The Astounding Analog Companion.

Paul Charles on “Jumping Off a Diving Board” at EQMM’s Something is Going to Happen.

John Possidente on “Red Sword of the Celiac” at Fantasty & Science Fiction.

Interviews
Art Taylor
at Washington Independent Review of Books.

Free Online Fiction
“The Man Who Wouldn’t” by Joseph S. Walker on ToughCrime.

Free Newsletter
The American Bystander is standing by at home with too much time on their hands, so they’ve created Bystander’s Quarantine Cavalcade. Subscribe here.

Readin’ and Writin’
Alec Cizak
added several of the earliest issues of Pulp Modern to Magzter this week. Of course, all of our joint issues from Volume Two are there as well.

And speaking of Pulp Modern, all the stories have been selected for the next issue. I’ll be working on layouts for the final three this weekend.

Finished reading and made notes on the second issue of Fotocrime for my article for the next issue of The Digest Enthusiast. Part of my research included reading True Crime, True North, full review here. Since the book’s focus is Canadian true crime magazines, it’s not directly relevant to Fotocrime, but seeing how the authors approached their topic was useful. Also exchanged a series of emails with John Shirley about Weirdbook No. 42, to provide readers with the backstory on the issue.

Also read Guns + Tacos Volume One, but I write more about that next week.

Verdict July 1953

Vintage Crime Digest
Verdict Vol. 1 No. 2 July 1953
Contents Page
Cornell Woolrich “All at Once, No Alice” art by Tom O’Sullivan
H.H. Holmes
“The Stripper” art by R. Cossette
Dorothy B. Hughes
“Homecoming”
Henry Kane “Kudos for the Kid” art by Tom O’Sullivan
Francis Lewis
“Has Anybody Here Slain Kely?”
Samuel Blas “Revenge”
Rex Stout “Fer-De-Lance” (Part 2 of 5)
Bruno Fischer “The Man Who Lost His Head”
Frank Kane “Suicide”
Leonard S. Grey “What’s Your Verdict?”

Verdict Vol. 1 No. 1 June 1953
Published monthly by Flying Eagle Publications, Inc.
Editor: John McCloud
Managing Editor: E.A. Tulman
Art Director: Chas. W. Adams
Business Magager: R.E. Decker
5.5” x 7.75” 144 pages 35¢

News Digest March 13, 2020

The Beat of Black Wings editor: Josh Pachter

The Beat of Black Wings, an anthology of crime fiction stories inspired by the music of Joni Mitchell, launches on April 7, 2020. Many of Mitchell’s classics are represented: “Both Sides, Now” by Art Taylor and Tara Laskowski, “Big Yellow Taxi” by Kathryn O’Sullivan, “River” by Stacy Woodson, “Cold Blue Steel and Sweet Fire” by Donna Andrews, “The Dry Cleaner From Des Moines” by Amber Sparks, “Ray’s Dad’s Cadillac” by Michael Bracken, etc. The collection was edited by Josh Pachter. The book will be released on April 7, 2020. Preorders are available in Hardcover $29.75, Softcover $19.55, and Kindle $5.99.

Steve Davidson reviews the premier episode of the new Amazing Stories series on AppleTV+ on, what else, the Amazing Stories blog.

Gideon Marcus examines Galaxy April 1965 at Galactic Journey.

Galaxy Apr 1965 & Amazing Apr 1965

John Boston does likewise for Amazing April 1965 also at Galactic Journey.

Tough Crime: “Walker’s Hollow” by John Floyd.

Q&A with Derek Kunsken at The Astounding Analog Companion.

Ian Tregillis on “Come the Revolution” (F&SF Mar/Apr 2020) at Fantasy & Science Fiction blog.

Jack Bunker writes about his debut with “Active Shooter” in the Mar/Apr 2020 issue of EQMM at Something is Going to Happen.

Read J.D. (EconoClash Review) Graves’ latest Flash Fiction “Trojan H” at Shotgun Honey.

Nostalgia Digest Spring 2020

March 2020 Digests
Nostalgia Digest Spring 2020
Contents
Steve Darnall “Hello, Out There in Radioland!”
A Few Moments with . . . Chuck Schaden
Chuck Schaden “Those Were the (Early) Days” (cover story)
“Those Were the Dates” Ten pivotal moments from the 50-year history of Those Were the Days.
Necrology for 2019
Laura Milbraith Stewart “All in the Families” (Tina Cole)
Dan McGuire “At This Theatre Next Week” Chapter Two
Stone Wallace “Everybody Loves Raymond” (Raymond Burr)
Greg Kreinberg “The Daly News”
Wayne Klatt “A Free Soul” (Jean Arthur)
Mail Call

Plus, the Radio Program Guide for Those Were the Days and WGN Radio Theatre

Nostalgia Digest Book 46 Chapter 2 Spring 2020
Editor: Steve Darnall
5.5” x 8.5” 64 pages, b&w interior
$4.50 on newsstands
Four-issue subscription $17
Eight-issue subscription $30
Nostalgia Digest website

Readin’ and Writin’
Finished the audio book of The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells. First published in 1896, Moreau is a science fiction classic. Its concept isn’t as revolutionary in 2020 as 1896, but for its era it must have been horrific and shocking. Even today, the prose is terrific, my favorite parts were Wells’ fastidious descriptions of his animal hybrids.

Weirdbook No. 42

Also immensely enjoyed the print edition of Weirdbook No. 42, a special all John Shirley issue, edited by Doug Draa. A triumphant collection of short stories and poetry capped by a sword and sorcery epic that wraps the volume with an enthralling finale.

I completed reading and making notes on the first issue of Fotocrime this week. Still lots to do but it feels good to get this article for TDE12 started.

Rick McCollum sent the cover art for the next issue of Pulp Modern which should see release sometime this Spring. I loved Rick’s artwork for the last PM and the current TDE, but I gotta say, I think this is the best one yet. It’s based on a story called “Ghost Town.”

PM editor, Alec Cizak, has selected another two stories for the issue, so I’ll be working on layout for those over the next few days.

Verdict June 1953

Vintage Crime Digest
Verdict Vol. 1 No. 1 June 1953
Contents Page
Rex Stout “Fer-De-Lance” (Part 1 of 5)
Craig Rice “His Heart Could Break” (John J. Malone) art by R. Cossette
Dan Stoup’s
Tricks of the Trade: Fingerprints
Henry Kane “A Glass of Milk”
Steve Fisher “Goodbye Hannah”
Chester B. Himes “Marihuana and a Pistol” art by R. Cossette
Fredric Brown
“Don’t Look Behind You”
Edward Clark’s Crime Firsts: The La Rosa Case
Raymond Chandler “Trouble Is My Business”

Verdict Vol. 1 No. 1 June 1953
Published monthly by Flying Eagle Publications, Inc.
Editor: John McCloud
Managing Editor: E.A. Tulman
Art Director: Chas. W. Adams
Business Magager: R.E. Decker
5.5” x 7.75” 144 pages 35¢

News Digest Feb. 21, 2020

Analog masthead, Matthew Hughes

AnLab Reader’s Award Finalists posted on Analog SF. (Hat tip to Mary Burgess.)

Catherine Wells, who has a story in the March/April 2020 issue of Analog called “Respite,” writes about arrogance on the magazine’s blog.

Matthew Hughes gives insights into “Air of the Overworld” in the current issue of Fantasy & Science Fiction.

Gideon Marcus declares F&SF March 1965 “is a dud” at Galactic Journey.

John Floyd discusses his story “Crow’s Nest” from Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine (Jan/Feb 2020) at SleuthSayers.

Mystery Scene No. 163, The Pulpster No. 29

Mystery Scene magazine No. 163 is out. Full contents list, with links to order a single issue or subscription information here.

Have something to share about a Weird Tales, H. P. Lovecraft, Margaret Brundage, or anyone or anything else related to “The Unique Magazine?” Or something about vintage paperbacks and pulps? Bill Lampkin, the editor of the award-winning PulpFest program book, The Pulpster, would like to hear from you. Check out the post, “The Pulpster Wants You in 2020!” on the PulpFest website.

bare•bones No. 1
Front and back cover of bare•bones No. 1 Winter 2020

The reboot of bare•bones No. 1 (Winter 2020), covering vintage, forgotten and overlooked horror/mystery/sci-fi/western/weird films, paperbacks, comics, pulp fiction, and video, arrived this week.

Contents Page
Peter Enfantino, John Scoleri: Dueling Editorials
Thomas Deja “An Introduction to Ed Noon—The Worst Detective Ever Created”
Matthew R. Bradley “The Martian Chronicles on Screen”
Thomas W. Flynn, Jr. “The Spaghetti Western/Martial Arts Mash-Ups of the 1970s”
John Scoleri “Born of I Am Legend”
Gilbert Colon “Book Two of Lin Carter’s ‘People of the Dragon’ Saga”
Peter Enfantino “Digging into Crime Digests”
John Scoleri “Christian Stavrakis: The bare•bones Interview”
J. Charles Burwell “A Survey of Key Hardboiled/Noir Anthologies”
Peter Enfantino “Sleaze Alley”
John Scoleri “What’s on the Tube: January 1–7, 1972”
David J. Schow “R&D”
About the Contributors

Editors: Peter Enfantino, John Scoleri
Layout: John Scoleri
6” x 9” 102 pages
Print $9.95

Bonnie Hearn Hill, whose “Feliz Navidead” appeared in the Jan/Feb 2020 issue of EQMM, discusses the books that helped shape her writing at Something is Going to Happen.

Also from EQMM (hat tip Josh Pachter): contents for the May/Jun 2020 issue which goes on sale April 21, 2020.

Rick McCollum's WIP

Readin’ ’n Writin’
Rick McCollum
was busy (well, he’s always busy) this week working on the cover of the next Pulp Modern. He posted the photo of his WIP on his Facebook page. The image is based on a scene from one of the yet-to-be-announced stories.

The move to color for the print edition of The Digest Enthusiast has garnered mostly positive feedback, but I have heard a couple of concerns about the higher price. One reader suggested offering both a color and black-and-white version. If anyone cares to weigh-in please send an email or leave a comment on the Larque Press Facebook page.

Mike Shayne April 1957

Read the second part of Brett Halliday’s serialized Weep for a Blond Corpse in the April 1957 issue of Mike Shayne Mystery Magazine this week. Although the issue includes a nice collection of novelets by Frank Ward and Richard Deming; short stories by Lawrence Treat, Walt Sheldon, C.L. Sweeney, Jr., William R. Cox, and Arthur Feldman; and part two of Halliday’s novel, it wasn’t quite as good at the previous issue. My favorites were Deming’s creepy crime novelet, Sweeney, Jr.’s “Soft, White Body,” and Treat’s humorous yarn. I also enjoyed Halliday’s prose and Cox’s trouble with gangsters.

From the Vault
A correction to last week’s True Crime Detective stats. The Winter 1953 issue is incorrectly labeled as Vol. 2 No. 5 inside. It is actually Vol. 3 No. 1, as labeled correctly on its spine. Now onto this week’s digest:

True Crime Detective Spring 1953

True Crime Detective Vol. 3 No. 2 Spring 1953
Contents Page
Walter Wanger “What I Found in Jail”
Joseph A. Shay as told to Robert P. Wilmot “A Rake’s Progress”
Kurt Singer “The Man Who Sank the Royal Oak”
Anthony Boucher “Do You Believe . . . ?” A department of criminous mythology
Stuart Palmer “Death and the Farmer’s Daughter”
F. Tennyson Jesse “The Importance of Spelling”
A.P. Herbert “Rex v. Puddle: Blackmail”
Verdict of Two: a book review department by the Editors
Anthony Boucher “The Tragedy of Samuel Savile Kent”
“The Truth About Lizzie Borden”
Stewart H. Holbrook “Death and Times of a Prophet”
Richard Brennan “The Case of the Talking Reindeer”

Publisher: Lawrence E. Spivak
Editors: Anthony Boucher, J. Francis McComas
General Manager: Joseph W. Ferman
Managing Editor: Robert P. Mills
Advisory Editor: Charles Angoff
Consulting Editor: Edward D. Radin
Art Director: George Salter
Cover: Dirone Photography from “The Tragedy of Samuel Savile Kent”
5.5” x 7.75” 128 pages 35¢

News Digest Feb. 14, 2020

Shadow of Doubt by Mary Wickizer Burgess

The British edition of Mary Wickizer Burgess’ latest Gail Brevard mystery, Shadow of Doubt, is out from Lynford Mystery. Meanwhile, the US version is available from Wildside Press, along with other books in the series.

The Winter 2020 newsletter from Paul D. Marks includes news about his coming novel: The Blues Don’t Care, notice of three new interviews/articles, including his discussion of the Bunker Hill series from Ellery Queen in The Digest Enthusiast No. 11, a little history lesson on La La Land, Noirville with Nat King Cole, What’s Next, and Dog Tails. Subscribe at PaulDMarks.com

Robert Lopresti highlights an intriguing story, “Murderer Bill” by John Grant, in the Jan. 2020 Mystery Weekly Magazine over at Little Big Crimes.

Pulp Adventures No.34

Just out is the new issue of Pulp Adventures, No. 34, with classic pulp fiction by William Decatur and a Hollywood Detective yarn by Robert Leslie Bellem. There’s new pulp fiction by William M. Hope, Logan Robichaud, Charles Burgess, Adam Beau McFarlane, Patti Boeckman & Sharla Wilkins, and Ron Riekki. Plus a Dan Turner comics adventure by Bellem and Adolphe Barreaux. PA is published by Rich Harvey and edited by Audrey Parente from Bold Venture. Print $9.95

Analog interviews Douglas F. Dluzen about his story “Welcome to the New You: Terms and Conditions for the iCRISPR Gene-Editing Kit” in the current issue. The Astounding Analog Companion

F&SF Masthead

Auston Habershaw on “Three Gowns for Clara” F&SF blog.

Occult Detective Magazine No. 6

Matthew X. Gomez reviews Occult Detective Magazine No. 6 at EconoClashReview.com

Michael Bracken exposes his life of crime over at SleuthSayers.com.

Mark SaFranko shares his thoughts “From the Short Story to the Big Screen” over at Something is Going to Happen.

John Boston reviews Amazing Stories March 1965 at GalacticJourney.org

Michael Neno reviews The Island of Doctor Moreau by H.G. Wells on Goodreads.

Rick McCollum

Rick McCollum shared his WIP with Ken Meyer, Jr. over at Ink Stains this week. If you only click on one link from this week’s digest, make it this one!

Thanks to Chuck Carter for posting a link to this Forbes article on SF and Fantasy magazines’ readership in 2020.

Pulp Literature February 2020 e-news includes an offer for ARCs of Allaigna’s Song: Aria by J.M. Landels, The Muse Retreats for writers, author news, Contest deadlines, and much more. Read it here.

J.T. Yost announced Birdcage Bottom Books 2020 lineup Kickstarter campaign.

James Reasoner called The Digest Enthusiast No. 11 “a spectacular issue” on Rough Edges this week, and Walker Martin commented he wished “it was bi-monthly.” If you’re not already a regular reader of Reasoner’s blog it’s one of life’s daily pleasures, and Martin often adds to the fun.

Brain Freeze
Rocket Roach

Jim Main is launching a new mini comic called Brain Freeze (logo art by Marc Haines). The first issue will include a two-page comic by Bob Vojtko rebooting an adventure of Rocket Roach and Radar. Watch this space for availability.

Readin’ ’n Writin’
Alec Cizak and I have been busy working on the next Pulp Modern. Still no firm publication date, but we’re about one-third through production. Rick McCollum is lined up for the cover and Ran Scott will illustrate the stories. Next submission window will be one day, February 23, 2020. Keep an eye on Pulp Modern’s Facebook page for the official announcement.

Rooftop Stew by Max Clotfelter

One of Birdcage Bottom Books 2019 releases was Rooftop Stew by Max Clotfelter, which I read earlier this week. J.R. Williams’ blurb sez it all: “HA, ha! I just love Clotfelter’s weird, gnarly drawings and sick, twisted stories… enjoy this book now, before the final apocalypse brings a sudden, merciful end to this troubled world…”

Michael Shayne Feb. 1957

Also read the Feb. 1957 issue of Michael Shayne Mystery Magazine. A diverse collection of crime stories: smart, screwball comedy by Veronica P. Johns; three solid deductive procedurals by Lee E. Wells, Jay Carroll, and Robert O’Neil Bristow; the suspense of abduction by Samuel W. Taylor, alternative realities by Henry Slesar, Robert Bloch, and Frank Kane; and the opening salvo of Brett Halliday’s Mike Shayne novel, Weep for a Blond Corpse. I’m reviewing this issue and the two that follow for either Peter Enfantino’s reboot of bare*bones magazine or The Digest Enthusiast No. 13.

From the Vault
True Crime Detective Winter 1953

True Crime Detective Winter 1953

True Crime Detective Vol. 2 No. 5 Winter 1953
Contents Page
Frank Mullady “The Wanton Murder of Arnold Schuster”
Edmund Pearson “The Day of Floradora”
J. Francis McComas “Until Your are Dead”
F. Tennyson Jesse “Murder in the King’s Household”
H.B. Irving “The Strange Case of Euphrasie Mercier”
Verdict of Two: a book review department by the Editors
Stuart Palmer “Once Aboard the Lugger”
Miriam Allen deFord “The Murderer was a Lady”
Index to Volume One and Two
Ad for The Book of Wit & Humor (Mercury Publications)

Publisher: Lawrence E. Spivak
Editors: Anthony Boucher, J. Francis McComas
General Manager: Joseph W. Ferman
Managing Editor: Robert P. Mills
Advisory Editor: Charles Angoff
Consulting Editor: Edward D. Radin
Art Director: George Salter
Cover: Dirone Photography from “Murder in the King’s Household”
5.5” x 7.75” 128 pages 35¢

The Future is Noir

Scotch Rutherford and Alec Cizak preview the future of criminal takes on technology in special editions of Switchblade and Pulp Modern. Available now in print and digital.

Switchblade: Tech Noir

Switchblade: Tech Noir
Contents Page
Scotch Rutherford: Editor’s Corner
Eric Beetner “Killer App”
Callum McSorley “Baby on Board”
John Moralee “Bad Score”
Mandi Jourdan “Folie à Deux”
Hugh Lessig “Muscle Memory”
Nick Kolakowski “Night Mayor”
Alec Cizak “Post-Biological-Stress-Disorder”
Matthew X. Gomez “Galatea in the Garden of Eden”
James Edward O’Brien “Torna Nails, Mindbender”
Rob D. Smith “Sundown”
Author Bios & Acknowledgements

Switchblade: Tech Noir October 2019
Editor: Scotch Rutherford
Cover Photos: Scotch Rutherford
Cover Model: Kiana Gonzalez
5” x 8” 222 pages
Print $8.99 Kindle $2.99
Switchblade Magazine website
Switchblade Merchandise

Pulp Modern: Tech Noir

Pulp Modern: Tech Noir
Contents Page
Alex Cizak: From the Editor
C.W. Blackwell “A Deviant Skin”
Nils Gilbertson “The Moderator”
Tom Barlow “Love in the Time of Silicone”
Deborah L. Davitt “Leaving Red Footprints”
Angelique Fawns “A Time to Forget”
J.D. Graves “Three, Two, One Zebra-Stripe Shake-Off”
Don Stoll “15 Minutes”
Jo Perry “Lights Out”
Zakariah Johnson “Walking Out”
Contact and Links

Pulp Modern: Tech Noir Fall 2019
Chief Editor: Alec Cizak
Guest Editor: Scotch Rutherford
Design: Richard Krauss
Cover and Interior Art: Ran Scott
Cartoons: Bob Vojtko
5.5” x 8.5” 132 pages
Print $6.99 Kindle $2.99
Pulp Modern website

Pulp Modern Vol. 2 No. 4 Summer 2019

Pulp Modern Vol. 2 No. 4

Don’t keep your new pals waiting. The new issue of Pulp Modern is here.

Pulp Modern Vol. 2 No. 4 Summer 2019
Alec Cizak: From the Editor
Rex Weiner “A Pinto, a Hooker, a Gun” art by Ran Scott
Russell Thayer “The Killer” art by Alfred Klosterman
C.W. Blackwell “Her Name Was Larceny” art by Alfred Klosterman
Albert Tucher “Modesy” (Diana Andrews) art by Dan W. Taylor
Matthew X. Gomez “The Price of an Offer Refused” art by Ran Scott
Scott Forbes Crawford “Heart of a Samurai” art by Ran Scott
Adam S. Furman “Rosetta” art by Ran Scott
Adam S. House “Odd Jobs” art by Ran Scott
S. Craig Renfroe Jr. “Chulainn” art by Ran Scott

PM4 back cover

Publishers: Uncle B Publications & Larque Press LLC
Editor: Alec Cizak
Design: Richard Krauss
Cover: Rick McCollum
Back Cover: Brian Buniak
Cartoons: Bob Vojtko
5.5” x 8.5” 132 pages
POD $6.99 Kindle (print replica) $2.99 Magzter $2.99

Pulp Modern website
Larque Press website

Ray Palmer’s Digest Dynasty

The Digest Enthusiast No. 9 pages 58 and 59

Inside The Digest Enthusiast No. 9 January 2019:

Vince Nowell, Sr. charts Ray Palmer’s digest dynasty from 1948 to 1958, followed by the bibliography of S.J. Byrne, one of Palmer’s go-to SF storytellers.

Special thanks to this issue’s advertisers:
Bud’s Art Books
Fantasy Illustrated
Mike Chomko Books
Modern Age Books
Pulp Modern
PulpFest 2019
Stark House Press
Switchblade

Ads in The Digest Enthusiast and very reasonably priced. Check out our rates and specs here.

Chris McGinley’s “The Killing at Queen’s Tooth”

Pulp Modern Vo. 2 No. 3 pages 114–115Stories from Pulp Modern Vol. 2 No. 3

Chris McGinley has published crime stories in Switchblade, Tough, the I.D. Press crime anthology (forthcoming), Story and Grit (forthcoming), and on a host of internet crime writing sites like Shotgun Honey, Out of the Gutter, Near to the Knuckle, and Yellow Mama. He also writes reviews and “re-considerations” for Unlawful Acts, the Flash Fiction Offensive, and SleuthSayers.

J.A. Prentice’s “Sand in a Jar”

Pulp Modern Vol. 2 No. 3 pages 98–99Stories from Pulp Modern Vol. 2 No. 3

Though he was born in the UK, J.A. Prentice has spent most of his life in the United States. In 2017, he graduated from San Francisco State University with a degree in Creative Writing. His work has previously been published by Crooked Teeth and 365 Tomorrows. He also contributes to the blog Living Authors’ Society, which can be found on WordPress,Tumblr, Facebook, and Twitter. He believes that the best way to write fantasy is to read history and mythology and then be a little insane.When he was five, he was attacked by a wild monkey, which annoyingly proved to be the most interesting thing that has happened to him.